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Expert lecturers

5–13 Aug 2015
7–12 Jul 2015
30 May–10 Jun 2015
29 Dec 2014–4 Jan 2015
20–27 Dec 2014
 Tom Abbott

Tom Abbott

    Specialist in architectural history from the Baroque to the 20th century with a wide knowledge of the performing arts. He graduated in Psychology and Art History from Carleton College, Minnesota and studied at the Louvre School of Art History in Paris. Since 1987 he has lived in Berlin and has organised and led many academic tours in Germany. Tom has a particular interest in the German and American architectural and artistic modern including the Bauhaus and Expressionism.

16–26 Sep 2014
1–11 Sep 2015
Professor James Allan

Professor James Allan

    Expert in Islamic art and architecture and Middle-Eastern archaeology. He read Arabic at Oxford, where he also completed his doctorate, and spent most of his career in Oxford’s Ashmolean Museum, where he also lectured for the Faculty of Oriental Studies. He has worked as a field archaeologist in Jerusalem and at Siraf and was President of the British Institute of Persian Studies, 2002–6.

2–15 Mar 2015
 Charles Allen

Charles Allen

    British writer and historian, he was born in India, where several generations of his family served under the British Raj. His work focuses on India and South Asia in general. Among his many books are Plain Tales from the Raj: Images of British India in the Twentieth Century (1975), Lives of the Indian Princes (1984), The Buddha and the Sahibs: the Men who Discovered India’s Lost Religion (2002) and Ashoka: The Search for India’s Lost Emperor (2012). In 2012 he filmed a documentary in India for the National Geographic entitled Unearthing the Bones of the Buddha.

4–11 Aug 2014
21–27 Sep 2015
Dr  Paul Atterbury

Dr Paul Atterbury

    Lecturer, writer, curator and broadcaster specialising in the art, architecture and design of the 19th and 20th centuries. Has published many books on pottery, porcelain, silver and antiques, also on canals and railways, and two books on the Thames. He has worked as an external curator of the V&A on a number of exhibitions including Pugin and The Victorian Vision and was Historical Advisor to Royal Doulton in Stoke-on-Trent. He is a long standing expert on BBC’s Antiques Roadshow.
     

29 Sep–4 Oct 2014
20–25 Apr 2015
 Helena Attlee

Helena Attlee

    Writer and lecturer with an expert knowledge of Italian gardens. Among her various books are Italian Gardens: a Cultural History, Italy’s Private Gardens, An Inside View and most recently The Land Where Lemons Grow: the Story of Italy and its Citrus Fruit (2014) as well as numerous other books and articles on gardens in a variety of countries. She has an MA in Italian dialect culture and is a Consultant Fellow of the Royal Literary Fund. She was Writer in Residence at the University of Worcester from 2009–2012.

8–15 Jun 2015
23–29 Sep 2014
Dr Paul Bahn

Dr Paul Bahn

    Archaeologist and Britain’s foremost specialist in prehistoric art. He obtained his PhD at Cambridge and is a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and a corresponding member of the Archaeological Institute of America. He led the team which discovered Britain’s only known Ice Age cave art at Creswell in 2003 and his books include Prehistoric Rock Art, Journey Through the Ice Age and Images of the Ice Age (forthcoming).

 Richard  Bassett

Richard Bassett

    Journalist and historian. Read Law at Cambridge and obtained an MA in the History of Art at the Courtauld. He was a staff foreign correspondent for The Times throughout the 1980s and early 1990s, covering central and eastern Europe. His books include Austrians: Tales from the Vienna Woods, Hitler’s Spy Chief: The Wilhelm Canaris Mystery; Traveller’s guide to Vienna with John Lehmann, Balkan Hours and A History of the Habsburg Army (2014).

 Lydia Bauman

Lydia Bauman

    Art historian, artist and lecturer at the National Gallery. Polish born, Lydia studied at Newcastle University and the Courtauld Institute, specialising in Matisse and 19-20th cent european and American art. She has also lecturered at the Tate, National Portrait Gallery and for numerous adult education institutions in London , as well as Museum of Fine Arts Boston and Arts Club of Chicago, USA. As a professional artist, her teaching style is informed by a familiarity with art practice. She is the author of forthcoming Guide to Great Themes of Art.

Dr Amira Bennison

Dr Amira Bennison

    Reader in the History and Culture of the Maghrib and a Fellow of Magdalene College, Cambridge. She gained her doctorate in Moroccan history from SOAS and her publications include Jihad and its Interpretations in Precolonial Morocco, as well as numerous articles on the culture, society and politics of Islamic Spain and Morocco.

14–23 Sep 2015
 Gail Bent

Gail Bent

    Expert on British architectural history and historic interiors and an interior designer and artist. She studied at Toronto and Leeds Universities and Edinburgh College of Art and has taught at the University of Leeds, Christ Church, Oxford, York and Nottingham. She lectures for The Art Fund, The National Trust and NADFAS, and has made appearances on BBC television as an expert in both country houses and architectural history.

30 Mar–11 Apr 2015
 Raaja Bhasin

Raaja Bhasin

    Author, historian and journalist. He has published seven books on the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh and its capital Shimla and is a recognised authority on both. He has handled assignments for television, including for the BBC, and for the Indian Institute of Advanced Study and various departments of the Indian Government. He writes regularly for magazines and papers in India and elsewhere. He is the state Co-convenor of the Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage.

Dr Steven Blake

Dr Steven Blake

    Historian and lecturer, specialising in the history of Cheltenham, Gloucestershire and mediaeval architecture. He worked for thirty years at Cheltenham Art Gallery & Museum and has served on many society councils in the West Country. He obtained his PhD from Reading University and is a Fellow of the Museums Association and the Society of Antiquaries.

Professor Tim Blanning

Professor Tim Blanning

    Emeritus Professor of Modern European History at the University of Cambridge, Fellow of Sidney Sussex College and Fellow of the British Academy. Among his many books are a study of Emperor Joseph II, the award-winning The Culture of Power and the Power of Culture, the best-selling The Pursuit of Glory: Europe 1648-1815, and the much-translated The Triumph of Music in the Modern World. His most recent book is The Romantic Revolution.

8–14 Sep 2014
Dr Flavio Boggi

Dr Flavio Boggi

    Art historian specialising in mediaeval and renaissance Italian art. He trained both in Scotland and Italy and is now head of the department of Art History at University College Cork, Ireland. He has published widely on the artistic culture of Tuscany. He is also interested in Emilian painting and has co-written two books on the Bolognese artist Lippo di Dalmasio.

19–26 Sep 2014
20–27 Dec 2014
 Monica Bohm-Duchen

Monica Bohm-Duchen

    Lecturer, writer and curator specialising in 20th-century art. She studied at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem before graduating in English Literature and History of Art from UCL, and with an MA in Art History from the Courtauld. She has lectured for the National Gallery, Tate, Royal Academy, Courtauld, Sotheby’s and Birkbeck College. Her latest book, Art and the Second World War (2013), is published by Lund Humphries in association with Princeton University Press.

27–31 May 2015
Dr Xavier  Bray

Dr Xavier Bray

    Art historian specialising in Spanish art and sculpture and Chief Curator of Dulwich Picture Gallery. Former posts include Assistant Curator of 17th and 18th-century European paintings at the National Gallery, London, where he curated numerous exhibitions: El Greco, Caravaggio: the final years, Velázquez and The Sacred Made Real: Spanish Painting and Sculpture 1600–1700. He completed his PhD at Trinity College, Dublin.

13–24 Sep 2014
21 Mar–1 Apr 2015
12–23 Sep 2015
13–21 May 2015
 James Brown

James Brown

    Historian specialising in Morocco and with a wider interest in the history of the Muslim world and global history. He studied at the universities of Oxford and Cambridge and SOAS. He has worked as a journalist and teacher, and is currently planning post-doctoral research on the relations between Morocco and Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Professor John Bryan

Professor John Bryan

    Professor of Music and Head of Music and Drama at the University of Huddersfield. He regularly contributes to BBC Radio 3’s early music programmes and is artistic adviser to York Early Music Festival. He is a member of the Rose Consort of Viols and Musica Antiqua of London and is currently leading a project entitled ‘The Making of the Viol in Sixteenth-Century England’.

1–8 Jun 2015
 Polly Buston

Polly Buston

    Art historian specialising in Venetian art in Venice and Le Marche. She obtained an MA in French with English from Edinburgh University as well as an MA from the Courtauld Institute. She lectured at the Courtauld Summer School for several years and works for art history publishers as editor and picture researcher. She was co-author of Titian’s Venice, a multi-media project accompanying the 2003 National Gallery Titian exhibition.

Dr Katie Campbell

Dr Katie Campbell

    Started her career as a journalist and fiction-writer before obtaining a PhD in landscape history. She now works as a writer, lecturer and tour guide, and helps to run Bristol University’s MA in Garden History. Recent publications include Icons of Twentieth Century Landscape Design, Policies & Pleasaunces: A guide to the Gardens of Scotland and Paradise of Exiles: The Anglo-American Gardens of Florence.

1–9 Oct 2014
22–30 Apr 2015
–18 Sep 2014
–22 Oct 2014
 Jon Cannon

Jon Cannon

    Writer, lecturer and broadcaster whose research focuses on English cathedrals. He presented and co-wrote the BBC’s How to Build a Cathedral and his publications include Cathedral: the great English cathedrals and the world that made them and in 2013 The Secret Language of Sacred Spaces. He teaches at Bristol University and was previously Communications Manager for English Heritage and for the Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England.

10–13 Sep 2015
 Terry Charman

Terry Charman

    Senior Historian at the Imperial War Museum. During his thirty-seven years there he has worked on many exhibitions and projects including The Churchill Museum, Holocaust exhibition, and D-Day to Victory exhibition. As well as giving frequent lectures, he has made numerous TV and radio appearances as IWM spokesperson, and is an authority on the Battle of Britain and the Blitz.
     

1–13 Sep 2014
8–17 Oct 2015
25 Jun–3 Jul 2015
Dr Harry Charrington

Dr Harry Charrington

    Architect and Principal Lecturer in architecture at the University of Westminster with a particular interest in the history of modernism. He read Architecture at Cambridge, where he was the founding editor of Scroope: Cambridge Architectural Journal, and subsequently combined academia and practice in both England and Finland. He obtained his PhD from the LSE on Alvar Aalto and has published widely on his work. His most recent book Alvar Aalto: the Mark of the Hand won the RIBA President’s Award for Research 2012. As of September 2014, he takes up a new post as Head of Architecture at Westminster.

10–20 Jan 2015
Professor Dawn Chatty

Professor Dawn Chatty

    Professor of Anthropology and Forced Migration at the University of Oxford. She has long been involved with the Middle East as a university teacher, development practitioner, and advocate for indigenous rights. Her doctoral research in Syria and Lebanon among Bedouin sheep herders as well as her later work among camel nomads in the Sultanate of Oman has given her a breadth of field-based experience from the Levant to the Gulf.

3–8 Nov 2015
7–14 Mar 2015
Dr Kevin Childs

Dr Kevin Childs

    Writer and lecturer on culture and the arts with a focus on the Italian Renaissance. He studied English Language and Literature at Oxford University followed by postgraduate studies at the Courtauld. He has held fellowships at the Dutch Institute in Florence and the British School in Rome. He blogs regularly for Huffington Post and has published articles and reviews in The New Statesman and Courtauld Reviews. He is currently working on a book looking at the development of the concept of autonomous style in the visual arts.

20–28 Oct 2014
12–20 Oct 2015
Dr Felicity Cobbing

Dr Felicity Cobbing

    Executive and Curator of the Palestine Exploration Fund in London. She has excavated in Jordan with the British Museum, and worked throughout the Middle East, particularly Syria and Lebanon. Widely published on the archaeology and the history of archaeology in the Levant, she is co-author with Dr Raouf Sa’d Abujabber of Beyond the River – Ottoman Transjordan in Original Photographs.

     

26 Sep–4 Oct 2015
28 Aug–1 Sep 2014
22–27 Sep 2014
Dr R T Cobianchi

Dr R T Cobianchi

    Art historian and lecturer. He completed his PhD at Warwick University, was a Rome Scholar at The British School in Rome and was fellow of both the Biblioteca Hertziana, Rome, and Villa I Tatti, Florence­. His research includes iconography and patronage of the late Middle Ages to the Baroque.

Professor Barry Cooper

Professor Barry Cooper

    Professor of Music at the University of Manchester. His books include Beethoven & the Creative Process, Beethoven’s Folksong Settings and Beethoven in the Master Musicians series. In 1988 his completion of the first movement of Beethoven’s unfinished 10th Symphony was performed at the Royal Festival Hall and he has recently published a new edition of Beethoven’s thirty-five piano sonatas for the Associated Board.

Dr David  Cordingly

Dr David Cordingly

    Art historian and naval historian and Keeper of Pictures and Head of Exhibitions at the National Maritime Museum for twelve years. Among his books are Life Among the Pirates, Cochrane the Dauntless and the highly praised Billy Ruffian: HMS Bellerophon and the Downfall of Napoleon.

     

–16 Sep 2014
 Peter Cormack

Peter Cormack

    Studied art history at Cambridge and was formerly Keeper of the William Morris Gallery, London, where he curated many exhibitions about aspects of the Arts & Crafts Movement, with a particular focus on stained glass. He is currently the Honorary Curator of William Morris’s Oxfordshire home, Kelmscott Manor. A Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and a Vice-President and Honorary Fellow of the British Society of Master Glass-Painters, his forthcoming (2015) book Arts & Crafts Stained Glass was written while he was a Research Fellow at the V&A Museum.

4–7 Jul 2015
 Imogen Corrigan

Imogen Corrigan

    Specialist in Anglo-Saxon and mediaeval history. She spent twenty years in the army, retiring in the rank of Major, then obtained a first-class degree in Medieval History from the University of Kent, and has been studying and lecturing ever since. Imogen is currently researching a PhD at the University of Birmingham.

25–29 Jun 2015
21–25 Jul 2015
6–10 Jul 2015
2–6 Sep 2015
Major Gordon Corrigan

Major Gordon Corrigan

    Military historian and former officer of the Royal Gurkha Rifles. He served mainly in the Far East, but also in Berlin, Cyprus, Belize and Northern Ireland. Author of Wellington, A Military Life; Mud, Blood and Poppycock: Britain and the First World War and Loos 1915, The Unwanted Battle and A Great and Glorious Adventure – A Military History of the Hundred Years War and, most recently, Waterloo – A New History of the Battle and its Armies. Television appearances include Napoleon’s Waterloo and Battlefield Detectives. He is an Honorary Research Fellow of the Universities of Birmingham and Kent, a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society and a Member of the British Commission for Military History.

18–24 Sep 2014
2–8 Oct 2014
9–15 Apr 2015
17–23 Sep 2015
1–7 Oct 2015
 Steven Desmond

Steven Desmond

    Landscape consultant, specialist in the conservation of historic parks and gardens and architectural historian. Obtained an MA in Conservation from York and lectures for Buckingham and Oxford Universities as well as NADFAS. He is an advisor on historic gardens for the National Trust and broadcasts for the BBC and writes for Country Life. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Horticulture and Professional Associate of the Royal Horticultural Society.

21–28 Aug 2014
 Misha Donat

Misha Donat

    For more than 25 years Misha was a senior music producer for BBC Radio 3, and has given many radio talks and pre-concert talks at a number of venues in Britain. He writes programme notes, particularly for the Wigmore Hall, and CD booklets for many labels, and has lectured at universities here and in the USA. Currently he is working on a new edition of the Beethoven piano sonatas being published by Bärenreiter.

24 Feb–1 Mar 2015
6–13 Oct 2014
8–15 Mar 2015
24–31 May 2015
4–11 Oct 2015
20–27 Dec 2014
16–23 Sep 2014
15–22 Sep 2015
18–22 Nov 2014
24–28 Mar 2015
17–21 Nov 2015
7–12 Apr 2015
1–8 Nov 2014
Dr Michael Douglas-Scott

Dr Michael Douglas-Scott

    Associate Lecturer in History of Art at Birkbeck College, specialising in 16th-century Italian art and architecture. He studied at the Courtauld and Birkbeck College, University of London and lived in Rome for several years. He has written articles for Arte Veneta, Burlington Magazine and the Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes.

Professor Gregory Dowling

Professor Gregory Dowling

    Professor of American Literature at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice. Read English at Oxford University and has published widely including scholarly works on English and American literature, a co-edited anthology of American poetry about Venice and a guidebook to Byron’s Venice. He is non-fiction editor for the journal Able Muse, a member of the editorial board of the comparative poetry journal Semicerchio and contributes to the Time Out guide to Venice.

17–21 Mar 2015
Dr Michael Downes

Dr Michael Downes

    Dr Michael Downes has been Director of Music at the University of St Andrews since 2008. He is a reviewer for the Times Literary Supplement, and has lectured on music and opera for organisations including the Royal Opera House. He is the author of a highly praised study of contemporary British composer Jonathan Harvey. Since moving to Scotland, he has established St Andrews Opera and has become the musical director of the St Andrews Chorus.

Professor Sir Richard Evans

Professor Sir Richard Evans

    Regius Professor of History and President of Wolfson College at the University of Cambridge. He is author of numerous books on Central European history including The Coming of the Third Reich, The Third Reich in Power and The Third Reich at War, and is currently working on 'The Pursuit of Power: Europe 1815-1914', a volume in the Penguin History of Europe. His latest book is 'Altered Pasts: Counterfactuals in History' (Little, Brown, 2014).

27 Sep–6 Oct 2014
19–28 Sep 2015
Dr Andrew Farrington

Dr Andrew Farrington

    Assistant Professor in Ancient History at the Democritus University of Thrace, Komotini, in northern Greece. His specialism is the sporting life of the ancient Greeks, especially under the Roman empire, and he recently published a detailed study of the Isthmian games at Corinth. He also teaches for the Greek Open University and previously held academic posts in Australia and New Zealand.

19–24 Apr 2015
Dr Frances Fowle

Dr Frances Fowle

    Senior Curator of French Art at the Scottish National Gallery and Reader in History of Art at the University of Edinburgh. She is also a Trustee of the Burrell Collection and has curated several major exhibitions at the National Gallery of Scotland, including Impressionism and Scotland, Van Gogh and Britain and in 2014 American Impressionism. Her publications include Monet and French Landscape: Vetheuil and Normandy, Impressionism, Urbanism Environment, Van Gogh’s Twin: The Scottish Art Dealer Alexander Reid and Symbolist Landscape in Europe 1880–1910.

10–21 Oct 2015
 John M Fritz

John M Fritz

    Archaeologist, writer and Consulting Scientist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. He investigated prehistoric cultures of Arizona and New Mexico in the 1960s and 1970s. Since 1981, with George Michell, he has co-directed a team of researchers at Hampi, carrying out intensive documentation of surface remains, and has written on the city’s layout and cultural meaning. Among his joint publications are Where Gods and Kings Meet: the Royal Centre at Vijayanagara, City of Victory, New Light on Hampi and Hampi, a Story in Stone.
     

29 Dec 2014–4 Jan 2015
 Lucia Gahlin

Lucia Gahlin

    Teaches Egyptology at Exeter and Bristol and is a Research Associate at UCL’s Institute of Archaeology. She is closely involved with the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology and has worked on excavations at Amarna in Egypt. Her publications include Egypt: Gods, Myths and Religion.

8–14 Sep 2014
7–13 Sep 2015
17–23 Oct 2014
15–23 Jun 2015
1–10 Oct 2015
Dr Alexandra Gajewski

Dr Alexandra Gajewski

    Specialist in mediaeval architecture. She read Art History at Münster University, Germany, followed by a PhD in Gothic architecture in northern Burgundy from the Courtauld Institute of Art. She has lectured at the Courtauld, at Birkbeck College and at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Currently, she working at the Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales in Madrid, where she is part of a research team investigating ‘The Roles of Women as Makers of Medieval Art and Architecture’.

20–27 Sep 2015
20–25 Oct 2014
2–14 Nov 2015
Dr Ffiona Gilmore Eaves

Dr Ffiona Gilmore Eaves

    Read Archaeology at Cambridge followed by a PhD from Nottingham on the early church at Porec. She has lectured for the WEA, for whom she founded and managed a study tours section, and for various extra-mural departments. She is the co-author of Retrieving the record: a century of archaeology at Porec published by the University of Zagreb.

21–30 Oct 2014
24 Mar–2 Apr 2015
13–22 Oct 2015
Dr Garth Gilmour

Dr Garth Gilmour

    Biblical archaeologist based at Oxford University, where he also obtained his doctorate. He has lived in Israel and excavated at the Philistine sites of Ekron and Ashkelon. His interests include eastern Mediterranean trade in the Late Bronze Age and the archaeology of religion in ancient Israel and he is currently researching the Palestine Exploration Fund’s excavation in Jerusalem in the 1920s.

8–23 Oct 2014
11–26 Feb 2015
7–22 Oct 2015
 Jacopo Gnisci

Jacopo Gnisci

    Art historian specialising in Ethiopian and early Christian art. He is a PhD researcher at SOAS. He holds a MA with distinction in the Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, and a BA in History and Preservation of the Cultural Heritage. His current research focuses on representations of the Passion in Ethiopian art. He edits the journal of the Anglo-Ethiopian Society and has published several papers, as well as given numerous lectures, on the country’s heritage. Jacopo has travelled extensively in Ethiopia and has won several awards for his research. He is currently working on an exhibition of Ethiopian art.

6–19 Oct 2014
4–17 May 2015
5–18 Oct 2015
 David Gowan

David Gowan

    British Ambassador in Belgrade from 2003–6 and Minister and Deputy Head of Mission in Moscow from 2000–3. He was Kosovo War Crimes Co-ordinator in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in 1999. His earlier career included postings in Moscow, Brasilia and Helsinki. In the UK he had two attachments to the Cabinet Office. He has been Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the University of Birmingham and Guest Member of St Antony’s College, Oxford. He has published papers on Serbia and Kosovo and is now involved with the Russian Booker Prize.

Dr Angus Graham

Dr Angus Graham

    Archaeologist and researcher. He is a Wallenberg Academy Fellow at Uppsala University, Sweden, and Honorary Research Associate at the Institute of Archaeology, UCL. He is the Field Director of the Theban Harbours and Waterscapes Survey and has worked on archaeological projects at Giza, Memphis, Karnak and Edfu.

13–18 Oct 2014
20–25 Apr 2015
28 Sep–3 Oct 2015
Dr Mark Grahame

Dr Mark Grahame

    Archaeologist and lecturer, Mark obtained his degree and PhD from Southampton University. His thesis on the spatial layouts of the houses of Roman Pompeii was published as a British Archaeological Report, and a series of journal articles. He has taught courses on the archaeology and history of the Roman Empire and teaches at Cambridge University Department of Continuing Education.

8–21 Sep 2015
Dr Jamie Greenbaum

Dr Jamie Greenbaum

    Historian specialising in Ming dynasty cultural history and resident in Beijing since 2004. He is a Visiting Fellow in the School of Culture, History & Language at the Australian National University. He is also involved with Renmin University in Beijing, teaching and mentoring post-graduate students. In this period he has published two books; one on the late-Ming literary world, and the other a translation and commentary on the final writings of an early twentieth-century Chinese political figure. He is currently working on an annotated translation of a 17th century literary compilation.

17–21 Aug 2014
16–20 Aug 2015
 Angus Haldane

Angus Haldane

    After studying Classics at University College, Oxford, and Byzantine and Renaissance art at the Courtauld Institute, Angus worked for many years as an expert in the Impressionist and 19th-Century Department at Christie’s and in the British Paintings Department at Sotheby’s. Angus now acts as a private art consultant, a dealer, a writer and a lecturer and is a member of the Society of London Art Dealers (SLAD). He had lectured on paintings in Italy, Greece and the US.

–19 Nov 2014
–7 Jan 2015
 Sheila Hale

Sheila Hale

    Writer and lecturer. Her book Titian: His Life and the Golden Age of Venice, published in 2012, is the first full biography of the artist in over a century. Her previous books include guidebooks to Florence and Tuscany and to Venice; Verona: An Architectural History; and The Man who Lost his Language. She has contributed to a number of American and British papers including the New York Times, Connoisseur, the London Observer, The Times Literary Supplement, and the London Review of Books. She lectures regularly on aspects of the Italian Renaissance, and is a Trustee of Venice in Peril.

–17 Sep 2014
 Michael Hall

Michael Hall

    A former architectural editor of Country Life and editor of Apollo magazine, Michael has published many articles and books on British architecture and design, including The Victorian Country House and Waddesdon Manor: The Biography of a Rothschild House. His book on the great Victorian architect George Frederick Bodley is published by Yale University Press in 2014. Now a freelance historian and journalist, he is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, chair of the Victorian Society’s activities committee and a trustee of Emery Walker’s Arts-and-Crafts house in Hammersmith.

26 Jan–11 Feb 2015
Professor Norman Hammond

Professor Norman Hammond

    A leading expert on Maya civilization and archaeology. Senior Fellow at Cambridge where he also studied, Associate in Maya Archaeology at the Peabody Museum, Harvard University, and Professor Emeritus of Archaeology at Boston University. His many books include Ancient Maya Civilization, Nohmul: a Prehistoric Maya Community in Belize and Cuello: an early Maya community in Belize. He was Archaeology Editor of the Times Literary Supplement and is Archaeology Correspondent for The Times.

Professor Adam  Hardy

Professor Adam Hardy

    Architect and architectural historian specialising in the architecture of Indian temples. His publications include Indian Temple Architecture: Form and Transformation and The Temple Architecture of India. He has been involved in the design of several Hindu temples in the UK, and is currently the architect for a new temple near Bangalore to be built in the style of the Hoysala dynasty. Professor of Asian Architecture at Cardiff University, where he runs the research centre PRASADA.

Dr Cecily Hennessy

Dr Cecily Hennessy

    Art historian who obtained her MA from the University of Washington and PhD from the Courtauld. She has lectured in universities in the USA and the UK and was head of Short Course and Adult Learning at the Courtauld Institute before joining Christie’s Education in 2006. Author of Images of Children in Byzantium published in December 2008.

 Amanda Herries

Amanda Herries

    Art historian, author and lecturer, now living in south-west Scotland. She read Archaeology at Cambridge and then worked as a decorative arts specialist at the Museum of London. This was followed by seven years living in Japan and she has written extensively on the influence of Japanese gardens and plants in the west. She is a contributing cataloguer for the Public Catalogue Foundation project and is a Trustee of the National Trust for Scotland.

Professor Judith Herrin

Professor Judith Herrin

    Mediaeval historian with degrees from Cambridge and Birmingham. She holds a Research Fellowship and is Professor Emerita at King’s College, London, was formerly Professor of Byzantine History at Princeton University. Her books include The Formation of Christendom, A Medieval Miscellany, and Women in Purple.

Professor Richard Hingley

Professor Richard Hingley

    Professor of Roman Archaeology at Durham and Director of the Durham Centre for Roman Culture. He is currently directing a major project on Hadrian’s Wall, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. His books include Roman Officers & English Gentlemen, Globalizing Roman Culture, Boudica: Iron Age Warrior Queen and The Recovery of Roman Britain.

Dr Frank Hoifodt

Dr Frank Hoifodt

    Art historian, lecturer and writer. He is an expert on the life and works of Edvard Munch and was for years a curator at the Munch Museum in Oslo. He has published extensively on the artist, most recently Munch (Tate Publishing 2012). He is a former director of the Vigeland Museum and is Associate Professor at the University of Oslo.

18–24 Mar 2015
8–14 May 2015
 Caroline Holmes

Caroline Holmes

    Garden historian, author and design consultant. She lectures for Cambridge University’s Institute of Continuing Education, NADFAS and the Landmark Trust. She is a regular contributor to BBC television and radio and her books include: Monet at Giverny, Follies of Europe – architectural extravaganzas, Impressionists in their Gardens – living light and colour, and in 2014, Herbs for Gourmet Gardeners for the RHS. Garden consultancies include the Royal Opera House’s New Production Campus for the Performing Arts and Notre-Dame-de-Calais.

6–13 May 2015
15–23 Sep 2014
18–31 Oct 2014
29 Sep–7 Oct 2015
30 Sep–11 Oct 2014
2–13 Jun 2015
8–19 Sep 2015
7–15 Apr 2015
10–14 Nov 2015
20–25 Apr 2015
19–29 Oct 2015
 Adam Hopkins

Adam Hopkins

    Journalist and author, now living in a mountain village in Spain. He studied at King’s College, Cambridge and has contributed extensively to national newspapers in Britain on Spanish culture and travel. His books include Spanish Journeys: a Portrait of Spain, Holland: its History, Paintings and People and Crete: its Past, Present and People. Together with his wife, Gaby Macphedran, he has devised many tours in Spain and Portugal.

Dr Tristram Hunt

Dr Tristram Hunt

    Member of Parliament for Stoke-on-Trent since 2010. His award-winning books include Building Jerusalem: The Rise and Fall of the Victorian City (2004), he is a frequent broadcaster on TV and radio and he writes regularly for The Guardian, The Times and elsewhere. He has special interests in urban regeneration, manufacturing and heritage.

11–20 May 2015
 Henry Hurst

Henry Hurst

    Emeritus Reader in Classics at Cambridge University. His special interest is the archaeology of ancient cities and he has been an excavating archaeologist – working at Carthage for many years and more recently in Rome. He has travelled widely in Greece and Turkey.

1–8 Sep 2014
7–14 Sep 2015
9–15 Sep 2014
15–21 Sep 2015
 Michael Ivory

Michael Ivory

    After studying modern languages at Oxford, he qualified as a town planner and landscape architect. He taught these subjects at university level and now works as a writer and translator, specialising in Central Europe. His publications include guides to Prague and the Czech Republic, including the Berlitz Czech Republic.

Dr Chloe Johnson

Dr Chloe Johnson

    Senior Curatorial Officer at Leamington Spa Art Gallery and Museum and previously worked at the Tate. She specialised in 19th-century British and French art at the Courtauld Institute and obtained her PhD from the University of Sussex on Pre-Raphaelite art. She has spoken on art, exhibitions and current affairs for BBC Coventry and Warwickshire.

 James Johnstone

James Johnstone

    Organist specialising in the Baroque. He is Professor of early keyboards at Guildhall School of Music and Drama and Trinity College of Music. He has performed and recorded extensively as a soloist and with the Gabrieli Consort & Players and Florilegium. He re-formed the chamber group Trio Sonnerie and recorded the Bach Motets on the historic organ in Naumburg with Trinity Baroque.

6–11 Jul 2015
 Neil Johnstone

Neil Johnstone

    Neil currently works with a regional enterprise agency in North Wales on Lottery-funded local heritage tourism projects. His works on the royal courts of the Welsh princes and related excavations have been published in Studia Celtica and have shed new light on the archaeology of mediaeval Gwynedd. He is a popular speaker on the Welsh lecture circuit, and has run numerous courses on the archaeology of Wales throughout the region. He broadcasts regularly on Welsh language television and radio, and is currently vice chairman of Segontium Roman museum and a Member of the Institute of Field Archaeologists.

 Nigel Jones

Nigel Jones

    Nigel Jones is author of Tower: An Epic History of the Tower of London (2011).

5–17 Oct 2015
9–16 Mar 2015
Dr Philippa Joseph

Dr Philippa Joseph

    Author, lecturer and researcher. For twenty years she published journals and books on behalf of societies including the Association of Art Historians, The Historical Association, and Society for Renaissance Studies. She is now an independent lecturer and researcher, reviews editor for History Today, and sits on the publishing board of the Institute of Historical Research, London. Her PhD concentrated on architectural and cultural exchange between Seville and Renaissance Italy, but her current research looks more broadly at late mediaeval and early modern societies in Andalucía and Sicily where Christian, Jewish, and Muslim cultures flourished, each building on a Classical past.

Dr Shona Kallestrup

Dr Shona Kallestrup

    Art historian and linguist and a specialist in the art of Scandinavia and Central and Eastern Europe. She has an MA from the Warburg Institute and a PhD from the University of St Andrews. She has taught at the Universities of Copenhagen, St. Andrews, Aberdeen and Edinburgh. The author of Art and Design in Romania 1866–1927, her current research includes Scandinavian national revival movements and the work of Asger Jorn.

 Jonathan Keates

Jonathan Keates

    Recently retired from teaching English at the City of London School. As author and journalist, his non-fiction books include biographies of Handel and Purcell and The Siege Of Venice, and fiction includes the short story collections Allegro Postillions and Soon To Be A Major Motion Picture. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, a trustee of the London Library and chairman of the Venice In Peril Fund.

 John Keay

John Keay

    John Keay has been visiting India for over forty years as a journalist, author and lecturer. His India: A History and The Honourable Company: A History of the East India Company are considered standard texts; The Great Arc on the mapping of India was a best-seller. A history scholar at Magdalen, Oxford, but long resident in Scotland, he also writes on exploration and other Asian regions, and he co-edited The Collins Encyclopaedia of Scotland and Macmillan’s London Encyclopaedia (third edition).

9–19 Sep 2014
Professor Hugh Kennedy

Professor Hugh Kennedy

    Professor of Arabic at SOAS and formerly Professor of Middle Eastern History at the University of St Andrews. He studied at the Middle East Centre for Arab Studies in Beirut, and read Arabic and Persian at Cambridge. He is author of The Early Abbasid Caliphate; The Prophet and the Age of the Caliphates; Crusader Castles and Muslim Spain and Portugal.

Sir Nicholas Kenyon

Sir Nicholas Kenyon

    Managing Director of the Barbican Centre and former Director and Controller of the BBC Proms. He has been music critic for The New Yorker and The Observer, music editor of The Listener and editor of Early Music. He is the author of the Faber Pocket Guide to Bach and edited Authenticity and Early Music.

5–17 May 2015
Dr Rose Kerr

Dr Rose Kerr

    Rose Kerr is Honorary Associate of the Needham Research Institute in Cambridge, having retired as Keeper of the Far Eastern Department at the Victoria & Albert Museum. She graduated in Chinese studies from the School of Oriental and African Studies and spent a year as a student in China during the last year of the Cultural Revolution, 1975–1976. She has published widely and acts as Honorary Fellow at the University of Glasgow, Chairman of the Great Britain-China Education Trust, Trustee of the Sir Percival David Foundation of Chinese Art and Museum Expert Advisor for Hong Kong.

7–13 Sep 2015
Professor Helen  King

Professor Helen King

    Helen is Professor of Classical Studies at The Open University and Visiting Professor at the Peninsula Medical and Dental School (Exeter and Plymouth), and at the University of Vienna. Her publications include Greek and Roman Medicine and Midwifery, Obstetrics and the Rise of Gynaecology: Uses of a Sixteenth-Century Medical Compendium. She has held research fellowships at Cambridge, Newcastle and in the Netherlands and visiting professorships in the US and Canada.

18–23 Jun 2015
 Caroline Knight

Caroline Knight

    Architectural historian specialising in 16th- to 18th-century British architectural and social history. She studied History and History of Art at London University, followed by an MA at the Courtauld Institute. She is Course Director of the V&A’s High Renaissance-Baroque Year Course, author of many articles and of London’s Country Houses. Visit Caroline's website.

Dr Konstanze Knittler

Dr Konstanze Knittler

    Dr Konstanze Knittler trained as a western art historian in Vienna, before acquiring a postgraduate diploma from Sotheby's Institute of Art, in the history of connoisseurship and collecting. After a few years in the commercial art market in Vienna, she was awarded a Leverhulme scholarship for doctoral studies at the University of Glasgow. Her PhD thesis focuses on collecting and the British art market for Chinese works of art in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Since 2010, Konstanze has been lecturing at Sotheby's Institute on two different Master programmes and has run her own short courses on Asian Art. A specialist in Chinese ceramics, Konstanze most recently provided expertise for www.theauctionroom.com where she was responsible for the Chinese sales in 2013.

19–25 Sep 2014
15–21 Jun 2015
20–27 Dec 2014
8–15 Sep 2014
7–15 Sep 2015
2–9 Jun 2015
Dr Jarl Kremeier

Dr Jarl Kremeier

    Art historian specialising in 17th- to 19th-century architecture and decorative arts; teaches Art History at the Berlin College of Acting and the Senior Student’s Department of Berlin’s Freie Universität. He studied at the Universities of Würzburg, Berlin and the Courtauld, is a contributor to Macmillan’s Dictionary of Art, author of a book on the Würzburg Residenz, and of articles on Continental Baroque architecture and architectural theory.

 Anthony Lambert

Anthony Lambert

    Historian, journalist and travel writer. He has worked with and for the National Trust in various capacities for almost thirty years. His books include Victorian & Edwardian Country House Life and he writes regular profiles of country houses for the Historic Houses Association magazine. He has written numerous travel and guide books, and contributes to a wide range of newspapers and magazines.

12–19 Oct 2015
Dr Helen Langdon

Dr Helen Langdon

    Studied at Cambridge, and received a doctorate from the Courtauld. She has contributed to many academic journals, and is the author of several books, including Claude Lorrain, Holbein, Caravaggio: a Life and, in 2013, Vision & Ecstasy: Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione’s St Francis. From 2002–3 she was Assistant Director of the British School at Rome, and later Research Fellow at the Getty Institute, LA, and Visiting Fellow at Yale. In 2010 she curated the exhibition, Salvator Rosa; Bandits, Wilderness and Magic, at Dulwich Picture Gallery in London.

Professor Richard Langham Smith

Professor Richard Langham Smith

    Music historian, broadcaster and writer with a particular interest in early music and 19th- and 20th-century French music. He co-authored the Cambridge Opera Guide on Pelléas et Mélisande and has published widely on Debussy and Bizet. Richard is currently Research Professor at the Royal College of Music. He read Music at York University and the Amsterdam Conservatory. He is currently working on Bizet’s Carmen, preparing both a new edition and a monograph.

13–19 Apr 2015
1–5 Oct 2014
6–10 May 2015
14–18 Oct 2015
21 Sep–3 Oct 2015
21–25 Aug 2014
20–27 Dec 2014
19–24 May 2015
Dr Luca Leoncini

Dr Luca Leoncini

    Art historian specialising in 15th-century Italian painting. His first degree and PhD were from Rome University followed by research at the Warburg Institute in London. He has published articles on the classical tradition in Italian art of the 15th century and contributed to the Macmillan Dictionary of Art. He has also written on Mantegna and Renaissance drawings.

23 Apr–7 May 2015
4–18 Sep 2015
9–21 Apr 2015
Dr Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones

Dr Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones

    Senior Lecturer in Ancient History at the University of Edinburgh and a specialist in the history and culture of ancient Iran, the Near East and Greece. His books include Ctesias’ History of Persia, Creating a Hellenistic World and King and Court in Ancient Persia. He has worked as a theatre practitioner for 25 years and as a director and designer for drama and opera. He has contributed to history documentaries for Channel 4, the History Channel and the BBC.

Dr Rosie Llewellyn-Jones

Dr Rosie Llewellyn-Jones

    An authority on colonial India from the 18th to the 20th century. She has published books on Lucknow including Engaging Scoundrels: True Tales of Old Lucknow and Lucknow, City of Illusion. Her book Mutiny, The Great Uprising in India: Untold stories, Indian and British won critical praise. She lectures for the Asian Arts course at the V&A. She is currently Secretary of BACSA (British Association for Cemeteries in South Asia) and works as part-time archivist at the Royal Society for Asian Affairs.

4–19 Oct 2014
9–24 May 2015
3–18 Oct 2015
 Rowena Loverance

Rowena Loverance

    Byzantine art historian specialising in sculpture, mosaics and icons. She studied History and Archaeology at Oxford and was Head of e-learning at the British Museum and a Visiting Research Fellow at King’s College, London. Her publications include the illustrated history Byzantium and Christian Art.

 Gerald  Luckhurst

Gerald Luckhurst

    Landscape architect and garden historian based in Lisbon who has an extensive knowledge of sub-tropical and Mediterranean garden flora. His work involves both historic restoration and contemporary garden design. Books include The Gardens of Madeira; Luigi Manini: Imaginário & Metodo; Sintra: a landscape with villas; and The Gardens of the National Palace of Queluz. He is currently writing a doctoral thesis on the gardens of Monserrate in Sintra, near Lisbon.

Professor Diarmaid MacCulloch

Professor Diarmaid MacCulloch

    Diarmaid MacCulloch, DD, FBA, FRHistS, FSA, Professor of the History of the Church at Oxford, Fellow of St Cross College, Oxford, and prize-winning author, has written extensively on the sixteenth century and beyond it, including Thomas Cranmer: a life (Yale UP), which won the Whitbread Biography Prize. His History of Christianity: the first three thousand years (Penguin Press) and the BBC TV series based on it first appeared in 2009; the book won him the Cundill Prize, the world’s largest prize for history, in 2010. His three-part TV series for BBC2, How God made the English aired in March 2012. He was knighted in the New Year’s Honours List of 2012.

12–18 Sep 2014
29 Sep–5 Oct 2014
7–13 May 2015
10–16 Sep 2015
Dr Alexey Makhrov

Dr Alexey Makhrov

    Russian art historian and a graduate of the St Petersburg Academy of Arts. Obtained his PhD from the University of St Andrews followed by post-doctoral work as a Research Fellow at Exeter University. He is now studying International History and Politics at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies Geneva. 

     

–12 Nov 2014
–14 Jan 2015
 Andrew Martin

Andrew Martin

    Journalist, novelist, historian and author of Underground Overground: a Passenger’s History of the Tube (2012). During the 1990s he was ‘Tube Talk’ columnist for the Evening Standard.

 Nigel McGilchrist

Nigel McGilchrist

    Writer and lecturer now living near Orvieto producing olive oil and wine. Worked for the Italian Ministry of Arts in the field of wall-painting conservation and has taught at Rome University, the University of Massachusetts and was Dean of European Studies for a consortium of American Universities. For six years he walked every path and village of the sixty inhabited Greek islands which culminated in the twenty volume McGilchrist’s Greek Islands, abbreviated to the Blue Guide to The Aegean Islands.

21–28 Sep 2015
Dr David McGrath

Dr David McGrath

    Writer, translator and an expert on Spanish literature and culture. He completed his PhD in Hispanic literature at Queen Mary, London University, and is a Visting Research Fellow in Spanish at King’s College, London. He has written and translated variously on literature, drama, and art and is active in ARTES, the Spanish Visual Arts group. His current projects include a translation of Jusepe Martínez’s seventeenth-century treatise on the Noble Art of Painting, and an interview with Antonio López, the Realist painter. Over the last forty years he has travelled widely in Spain, where he has many family links.

23–30 May 2015
9–16 Sep 2014
24 Mar–1 Apr 2015
13–25 Oct 2014
13–25 Apr 2015
28 Aug–9 Sep 2015
6–10 Jul 2015
6–13 Jun 2015
–25 Sep 2014
 John McNeill

John McNeill

    Specialist in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, with degrees in art history from the University of East Anglia and the Courtauld. He lectures at Oxford University’s Department of Continuing Education and is Honorary Secretary of the British Archaeological Association. He is the author of the Blue Guide: Normandy, Blue Guide: Loire Valley and Romanesque and the Past, and has edited collections of essays on mediaeval Anjou, King’s Lynn and the Fens and the mediaeval cloister.

22 Sep–4 Oct 2014
28 Oct–10 Nov 2014
27–30 Jul 2014
 Patrick Mercer

Patrick Mercer

    Military historian. He read History at Oxford and then spent 25 years in the army, achieving the rank of colonel, and subsequently worked for BBC Radio 4 as Defence Correspondent and as a journalist. He was MP for Newark from 2001 to 2014 and is the author of two books on the Battle of Inkerman.

 Jeffrey Miller

Jeffrey Miller

    Art historian specialising in architecture of the Middle Ages. He obtained his MA from the Courtauld and his PhD from Columbia University where he is now a Core Lecturer. He has taught for the Culinary Institute of America as well as lecturing on mediaeval art and architecture for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. His writing will appear in the forthcoming Cambridge History of Religious Architecture of the World.

 Barry Millington

Barry Millington

    Chief Music Critic for London’s Evening Standard and founder/editor of The Wagner Journal, Barry is also the author/editor of eight books on Wagner, including Wagner, The Wagner Compendium, The Ring of the Nibelung: A Companion and Selected Letters of Richard Wagner. He has contributed Wagner articles to The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians and The New Grove Dictionary of Opera. His latest Wagner book, Richard Wagner: the Sorcerer of Bayreuth, was published by Thames & Hudson/OUP last autumn. He was the founder and artistic director of the Hampstead & Highgate Festival (1999–2003), has acted as dramaturgical adviser at international opera houses, and recently co-founded the ensemble Counterpoise. He is co-director of Wagner 200, a wide-ranging series of events celebrating the bicentenary of Wagner’s birth in 2013, and is known also as a broadcaster and lecturer.

11–17 Oct 2014
29 Sep–5 Oct 2014
19–25 Oct 2015
11–17 Apr 2015
3–9 Oct 2015
 Marc Millon

Marc Millon

    Wine, food and travel writer. Born in Mexico, he was raised in the USA before studying English Literature at the University of Exeter. Together with his wife, he has pioneered a series of illustrated wine-food-travel books including The Wine and Food of Europe, The Wine Roads of Italy and The Food Lover’s Companion to Italy. He also has his own wine company, importing Italian wines from small family estates.

14–28 Nov 2014
Dr Anna-Maria Misra

Dr Anna-Maria Misra

    Teaches history at Oxford University and is a Fellow of Keble College. She is a specialist on Indian history and the British Empire. She has written on many aspects of India’s history and culture, including Vishnu’s Crowded Temple: India since the Great Rebellion. She wrote and presented the Channel 4 series An Indian Affair and is a regular writer and broadcaster. She is currently writing a book on global cross-currents in art and architecture.

–11 Sep 2014
 David Mitchinson

David Mitchinson

    Former Head of Collections and Exhibitions at the Henry Moore Foundation. He has curated exhibitions of, and written extensively on Moore’s life and work, including Henry Moore: Unpublished Drawings, Celebrating Moore, and Hoglands: The Home of Henry and Irina Moore (2007). He is also co-author of the four-volume catalogue raisonné Henry Moore: Catalogue of Graphic Work. One of his most recent books is Henry Moore: Prints & Portfolios (2010).

Dr Andrew Moore

Dr Andrew Moore

    Writer and curator, and a specialist in the study of country houses and their art collections. Andrew is Keeper of Art at Norwich Castle Museum & Art Gallery. In partnership with the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, he recently co-authored a reassessment of Sir Robert Walpole’s art collection at Houghton Hall. He is a Visiting Fellow in the School of World Art Studies & Museology at the University of East Anglia. He is currently writing a book on the impact of Thomas Coke’s European Grand Tour on Holkham Hall, Norfolk.

13–19 Apr 2015
Dr Robert Morkot

Dr Robert Morkot

    Specialist in north-east Africa. He read Ancient History at University College London and postgraduate studies in Berlin. He has contributed to the Oxford Classical Dictionary and The Black Pharaohs: Egypt’s Nubian Rulers.

2–11 May 2015
4–11 Oct 2014
17–24 May 2015
Dr Oswyn  Murray

Dr Oswyn Murray

    Classics Fellow at Balliol College, Oxford, for almost forty years, widely travelled in the Mediterranean and a specialist on Greek drinking customs and the history of pleasure in general. Author of Early Greece, The Greek City and In vino veritas and over a hundred articles, mainly on Greek history. He was history editor of the Oxford History of the Classical World, and is a regular contributor to the Times Literary Supplement.

9–14 Sep 2014
10–15 Sep 2015
Professor Fabrizio Nevola

Professor Fabrizio Nevola

    Chair and Professor of Art History and Visual Culture at the University of Exeter, specialising in urban and architectural history of Early Modern Italy. He obtained his PhD at the Courtauld Institute and has held fellowships at the University of Warwick, the Medici Archive Project, and Harvard University’s Villa I Tatti (Florence). He has published widely including the award-winning Siena: Constructing the Renaissance City.

8–20 Sep 2014
16–28 Mar 2015
3–9 Nov 2015
15–22 Oct 2014
23–30 Sep 2015
 Christopher Newall

Christopher Newall

    Art historian, lecturer and writer. As well as being a specialist in 19th-century British art, he has a deep interest in Sicily, its architecture and political and social history. A graduate of the Courtauld Institute, he has organised various exhibitions including Pre-Raphaelite Vision: Truth to Nature (Tate Britain 2004). His interest in John Ruskin led to our tour Ruskin’s Venice, and he is currently working on an exhibition of Ruskin’s drawings for venues in Canada and Scotland.

Dr Charles Nicholl

Dr Charles Nicholl

    Honorary Professor of English at Sussex University and author of the acclaimed biography, Leonardo da Vinci: the Flights of the Mind and numerous other books including The Lodger, an intimate study of Shakespeare’s life in London in the first years of the 17th century. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and recipient of the Hawthornden prize, the James Tait Black prize for biography and the Crime Writers’ Association ‘Gold Dagger’ award for non-fiction. 

Professor Geoffrey Norris

Professor Geoffrey Norris

    Writer and regular broadcaster on BBC Radio 3. He was for many years the Chief Music Critic of The Daily Telegraph (1995–2009). He still writes for the Telegraph today, along with Gramophone and other journals. His publications include Rachmaninoff and contributions to the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. He also lectured at Royal Northern College of Music from 1977–83 and is Emeritus Professor at the Rachmaninoff Music Academy in Russia. He is chairman of the music section of The Critics’ Circle.

15–20 Sep 2014
Dr Cathy Oakes

Dr Cathy Oakes

    Graduated from Oxford and worked in the Education Department at the V&A. She ran the art history programme for the Department for Continuing Education at Bristol where she completed her PhD on late mediaeval Marian iconography and now holds a similar post at Oxford University. She has published on French and English Romanesque and on Marian iconography.

3–9 Oct 2014
 Alan Ogden

Alan Ogden

    Travel writer and historian. His travel books include Fortresses of Faith: the Kirchenburgen of Transylvania, Revelations of Byzantium: the monasteries and painted churches of N.E. Moldavia and Moons and Aurochs: Romanian journeys. He has written four histories of the Special Operations Executive (SOE) covering Eastern Europe, Italy, Greece and the Far East and has travelled extensively in Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

3–6 Sep 2014
2–5 Sep 2015
28 Jun–1 Jul 2015
Dr Sophie Oosterwijk

Dr Sophie Oosterwijk

    Researcher and lecturer with degrees in Art History, Mediaeval Studies and English Literature. She is an expert on the Middle Ages, Netherlandish and Dutch art, with a special interest in portraiture, death and commemoration. She has taught at the universities of Leicester, Manchester and St Andrews, and regularly lectures at Cambridge. She is a former editor of the journal Church Monuments and has published widely, including edited volumes on fourteenth-century sculpture and on the late-mediaeval Dance of Death.

6–11 Sep 2014
6–9 Aug 2014
 Ian Page

Ian Page

    Conductor and Artistic Director of the Classical Opera Company, which specialises in the works of Mozart and his contemporaries and performs regularly at Wigmore Hall, Cadogan Hall, the Barbican and Sadler’s Wells. He recently embarked on a new project to record all the Mozart operas, and has been a professor at the Royal College of Music in London since 1993.

 Amanda Patton

Amanda Patton

    Freelance garden designer, writer, broadcaster and artist. A member of the Society of Garden Designers and member of the Garden Media Guild, she has created Show Gardens at Chelsea and Hampton Court and has designed over 100 gardens. She lectures to garden societies and is a regular broadcaster on BBC Somerset. Her particular interest is in 20th-century and contemporary garden design.

4–13 May 2015
Dr Alan Peatfield

Dr Alan Peatfield

    Archaeologist specialising in the Minoan Bronze Age Civilisation of Crete. He was awarded his PhD in Greek Archaeology from University College London. From 1984–1990 was Knossos Curator for the British School at Athens and has been a lecturer at University College Dublin since 1991. He has excavated on Crete, notably at Knossos and he writes on Minoan religion and ancient Greek combat.

Dr Richard Plant

Dr Richard Plant

    Architectural historian specialising in the Middle Ages. After reading English at Cambridge he obtained an MA in the History of Art and a PhD on English Romanesque and the Holy Roman Empire at the Courtauld. He has published on English and German Romanesque architecture and he is currently a Course Director at Christie’s Education.

10–14 Mar 2015
 Jane Pritchard

Jane Pritchard

    Curator of Dance for the Victoria & Albert Museum and co-curater of the exhibition Diaghilev and the Golden Age of the Ballets Russes 1909–1929. She was Archivist for Rambert Dance Company and English National Ballet. She has contributed to journals, books, dictionaries and catalogues and curated seasons of dance films for the BFI Southbank and the British Council. Her latest book is entitled Anna Pavlova: Twentieth-Century Ballerina (2012).

26 Jan–8 Feb 2015
 Asoka Pugal

Asoka Pugal

    Historian and lecturer. Born in Tamil Nadu, he graduated in History from the University of Madras followed by postgraduate studies at Madras Law College. He has been working in the tourist industry for the past thirty years and has worked with Sir Edmund Hillary, and produced a Television Documentary on the Himalayas for German Television. From 1987 to 1992, he was a reporter for ZDF in India and produced the documentary Temples, Palaces & Houses of India. In 2001, he joined the Board of studies in Ancient History and Archaeology at the University of Madras.

1–11 Dec 2014
 Lesley Pullen

Lesley Pullen

    Art Historian, and lecturer at SOAS, University of London, where she tutors on the Southeast Asian Art module of the SOAS Postgraduate Diploma in Asian Art programme since 2009. Lesley was born in Sumatra, and has lived in Asia with her husband and family for 25 years, including latterly three years in India. She completed both her Postgraduate Diploma in Asian Art and Masters at SOAS and worked at Asia House in London for two years. She is currently pursuing her PhD at SOAS researching the ‘Representation of Textiles on Indonesian Sculpture: 9th to 14th century’.

5–16 Oct 2015
Professor John Ray

Professor John Ray

    Herbert Thompson Professor of Egyptology at the University of Cambridge, where he has taught since 1977. His publications concentrate on the Persian and Hellenistic periods of Egyptian history. He is a Fellow of Selwyn College Cambridge, of the Society of Antiquaries of London and of the British Academy.

20–24 Jul 2015
2–5 Oct 2014
 Simon Rees

Simon Rees

    Dramaturg of Welsh National Opera from 1989–2012. After studying English at Cambridge, he taught for two years in Italy and for three at Kyoto University. He has published novels, poetry, translations of works of art history and reviews of books on music, and has written libretti for children’s opera and oratorio with Welsh composer Mervyn Burtch.

 Julian Richards

Julian Richards

    Archaeologist, writer and broadcaster, perhaps best known for his BBC2 series Meet the Ancestors and Mapping the Town on BBC Radio 4. He has long been involved with the archaeology of Wessex, where he has lived and worked for over 30 years. He is the author of a series of English Heritage books about Stonehenge (including the current guide book).

11–15 Aug 2014
Professor Jane Ridley

Professor Jane Ridley

    Jane Ridley teaches History and leads the MA in Biography at the University of Buckingham. She read History at St Hugh’s College, Oxford, and was later a research student at Nuffield College, Oxford, gaining her DPhil in 1985. Publications include The Letters of Arthur Balfour and Lady Elcho, and, most recently, Bertie: A Life of Edward VII. She also broadcasts on BBC Radio 4 and reviews regularly for the Spectator, Literary Review and Times Literary Supplement.

 Mary Lynn Riley

Mary Lynn Riley

    Mary Lynn lives on the Côte d’Azur and is a specialist in 19th and 20th-century modern and contemporary art. She designs and teaches art courses and art appreciation workshops for adults at the Musée Bonnard in Le Cannet and the Espace de l’Art Concret at Mouans-Sartoux. She completed her Master of Fine Arts at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, USA and previously worked at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C.

6–12 Oct 2014
5–11 Oct 2015
13–20 Jan 2015
 Juliet Rix

Juliet Rix

    Writer and broadcaster with a particular interest in the history of Malta. She studied History of Art at Cambridge and is the author of the Bradt Guide: Malta and Gozo. Her career in journalism has involved working for the BBC and writing for British national newspapers, magazines and online media.

13–21 Oct 2014
2–10 Nov 2015
 Barnaby Rogerson

Barnaby Rogerson

    A writer and publisher whose works include a History of North Africa, A Biography of the Prophet Muhammad, a history of the First Four Caliphs and guide books to places such as Morocco, Tunisia, Cyprus and Istanbul. His most recent historical work is The Last Crusaders which tells the story of the simultaneous struggles of four Empires for the control of the Mediterranean from 1415-1578. Other recent projects include the text for Don McCullin’s Southern Frontiers, co-editing of Ox-Travels, a collection of 36 contemporary travel writers and Rogerson’s Book of (sacred and profane) Numbers. His day job is running Eland Books, home to over 100 great classic travel books of the world.

25 Oct–2 Nov 2015
29 Sep–5 Oct 2014
19–29 May 2015
 Sue Rollin

Sue Rollin

    Archaeologist, interpreter and lecturer. She studied at London University (Institute of Archaeology and SOAS) and at Heidelberg University and her linguistic repertoire includes three ancient Near-Eastern languages and several modern European ones. She has taught at UCL, SOAS and Cambridge University and interpreted for the EU and UN. With Jane Streetly she has written Blue Guide: Jordan and Istanbul: A Travellers’ Guide.

14–21 Apr 2015
Professor Ian Campbell Ross

Professor Ian Campbell Ross

    Emeritus Professor of 18th-Century Studies and Fellow of Trinity College Dublin. He has written widely on literature, cultural history, and travel, and translated Gian Gaspare Napolitano’s fictionalized memoir of war in central Italy in 1944 as To War with The Black Watch. Recently, he published Umbria: a Cultural Guide. A visiting professor at the university of Roma Tre, he has lectured in Ireland, the UK, Europe, and the US. He was made a Cavaliere dell’Ordine della Stella d’Italia in 2007.

Professor Andrew Sanders

Professor Andrew Sanders

    Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Durham and Past President of the Dickens Fellowship. Author of five books on Charles Dickens, the most recent of which is Charles Dickens’s London (2010). He has edited four of Dickens’s novels for various paperback series and has worked widely on 19th-century literature and culture. His new study, In the Olden Time: Victorians and the British Past, was published in Spring 2013.

29 Oct–6 Nov 2014
5–13 Oct 2015
 Anthony Sattin

Anthony Sattin

    Writer and journalist. He is the author of numerous books including The Pharaoh’s Shadow, The Gates of Africa and Young Lawrence, and co-author of the Lonely Planet guide to Algeria. He has an MA in Creative Writing from the University of East Anglia and for the past decade has been a regular reviewer of non-fiction – primarily for the Sunday Times, for whom he wrote a weekly book column for seven years. His journalism and travel writing have also appeared in a range of publications, including the Sunday Times, Daily Telegraph, Financial Times, Independent, Guardian, Spectator and Conde Nast Traveller. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, sits on the editorial board of Geographical Magazine and is a contributing editor to Conde Nast Traveller.

Professor Timon Screech

Professor Timon Screech

    Professor of History of Art and Head of the School of Arts at SOAS, University of London. He has also taught at numerous universities including Chicago, Heidelberg, Meiji and Waseda. He is an expert on the art and culture of the Edo Period, including its international dimension, and has published some dozen books on the subject. His best-known work is probably Sex and the Floating World, a study of erotica, and he has recently competed a field-defining overview of the Edo arts, Obtaining Images. His work has been translated into French, Japanese, Korean, Polish and Romanian. 

4–9 Sep 2015
Dr Diane Silverthorne

Dr Diane Silverthorne

    Art historian specialising in late-19th and 20th-century art, design and architecture. Studied at Birkbeck University of London, and took an MA in Cultural Memory and Museum Studies at the Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, before completing her PhD at the Royal College of Art. Diane lectures at Birkbeck. She recently contributed chapters to two anthologies, Music and Modernism c.1849–1950, and The Oxford Critical & Cultural History of Modernist Magazines V3, Europe 1880-1940.

 Janet Sinclair

Janet Sinclair

    Janet has held senior management posts at several Heritage Sites in the UK. She has was educated at the Courtauld Institute of Art, Bretton Hall and the Barber Institute Birmingham, where she researched the history of British collecting and taught for many years. She is also a freelance lecturer and consultant and has led European and UK tours for MRT. In 2012 she was Director of Michelham Priory in Sussex.

10–17 Sep 2014
Dr Jozsef Sisa

Dr Jozsef Sisa

    Head of Department at the Research Institute for Art History at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest. He specialises in the 19th century, in particular public buildings, country houses, Gothic revival and garden history. A native Hungarian with fluent English, he lectures in the UK, across Europe and the USA and co-edited The Architecture of Historic Hungary.

21–27 Sep 2014
24–30 May 2015
4–10 Oct 2015
Dr Guus Sluiter

Dr Guus Sluiter

    Art historian who has worked in a number of museums in the Netherlands including the Mauritshuis in The Hague and the Royal Palace in Amsterdam. Guus is currently Director of the Dutch Funeral Museum in Amsterdam, a board member of the Foundation of Amsterdam Museums and Research Fellow of the Dutch Institute for Art History in Florence. He has published widely in the Netherlands and Italy.

8–13 Apr 2015
Professor Jan Smaczny

Professor Jan Smaczny

    Hamilton Harty Chair of Music at Queen’s University, Belfast, and an authority on Czech music. An author, broadcaster and journalist, he has published books on the Prague Provisional Theatre, Dvořák’s Cello Concerto, Music in 19th-century Ireland and Bach’s B-minor Mass. He is a graduate of the University of Oxford, has studied at the Charles University in Prague and has worked extensively in university education.

14–21 Sep 2015
–11 Dec 2014
–22 Jan 2015
Professor Emeritus Antony Spawforth

Professor Emeritus Antony Spawforth

    Historian, broadcaster, lecturer and writer specialising in Greek and Roman antiquity and in rulers’ courts. Books include The Complete Greek Temples, Greece: An Oxford Archaeological Guide (with C. Mee), and Versailles: A Biography of a Palace. Formerly Assistant Director of the British School at Athens, he is now Emeritus Professor of Ancient History at Newcastle University.

15–21 Sep 2014
Dr Nigel Spivey

Dr Nigel Spivey

    Senior Lecturer in Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Emmanuel College. Among his publications are Understanding Greek Sculpture, Greek Art, Enduring Creation, The Ancient Olympics and Songs on Bronze. He presented the BBC2/PBS series How Art Made the World.

5–8 Sep 2014
4–7 Sep 2015
4–7 Jun 2015
 Andrew Spooner

Andrew Spooner

    Military historian specialising in the Great War. He runs his own battlefield tours and organises specialist study days for colleges and museums throughout the country. He is a regular visiting lecturer at the Imperial War Museum Duxford and has appeared in documentaries for the BBC and Channel 4.

–30 Sep 2014
–15 Oct 2014
–6 Nov 2014
–5 Feb 2015
Professor Gavin Stamp

Professor Gavin Stamp

    Independent architectural historian with an interest in 19th- and 20th-century British architecture. He has published on the work of Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson, the Gilbert Scott dynasty and Sir Edwin Lutyens. He is an Honorary Fellow of both the Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland and the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and honorary Professor at the universities of Glasgow and Cambridge. He taught History of Architecture at the Mackintosh School of Architecture, Glasgow, and is a former chairman of the 20th-Century Society and Director of the Victorian Society Summer School. His books include The Memorial to the Missing of the Somme.

11–16 Nov 2014
Dr Susan Steer

Dr Susan Steer

    Art Historian specialising in Venice. Her MA concentrated on the art and architecture of Venice, and her PhD on Venetian Renaissance altarpieces. As post-doctoral researcher with the University of Glasgow, and Neil MacGregor scholar at the National Gallery, she worked as a researcher and editor on the National Inventory of European Painting, the UK’s online catalogue of European paintings. She has extensive experience of teaching History of Art for university programmes in the UK and Italy.

7–13 Sep 2014
11–17 May 2015
6–12 Sep 2015
 Graeme  Stobbs

Graeme Stobbs

    Archaeologist from Gateshead, with over twenty years of experience in field archaeology, and acknowledged expert on Hadrian’s Wall. He has an MLitt in Archaeology from Newcastle University. He worked until recently as Archaeological Project Officer for Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums and is Assistant Curator of Roman Collections of English Heritage’s Hadrian’s Wall Museums.

 Richard Stokes

Richard Stokes

    Professor of Lieder at the Royal Academy of Music and recently retired as teacher of German at Westminster School. His books include Complete Cantatas of J. S. Bach; The Book of Lieder and translations of Kafka’s Metamorphosis and The Trial. He has lectured at the Edinburgh Festival, given masterclasses at Aldeburgh and collaborated on two books of poems by Alfred Brendel. In 2012 Richard was awarded the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany for services to German culture.

 Jane Streetly

Jane Streetly

    Co-author of Blue Guide: Jordan and Istanbul: A Traveller’s Guide. She was born and brought up in Trinidad, studied French and Spanish at university and now works as a conference interpreter and travel writer. She is a Fellow of the Royal Geographic Society and has travelled widely throughout Europe, Latin America and the Middle East.

5–10 Oct 2015
1–5 Oct 2015
10–16 Nov 2014
7–12 Oct 2014
11–15 Nov 2015
Dr Joachim Strupp

Dr Joachim Strupp

    Art historian and lecturer. He studied Art History at the universities of Nuremberg and St Andrews, where he also taught, and has lived in Venice and Florence for several years. He specialises in the sculpture of the Italian Renaissance, though his interests include German and Italian art of most ages. He lectures at the V&A and organises adult art history courses and tours.

 Tim Tatton-Brown

Tim Tatton-Brown

    Archaeologist and architectural historian. He has been Consultant Archaeologist for Canterbury, Rochester, Chichester and Salisbury Cathedrals, and for Westminster Abbey, Lambeth Palace and currently for St George’s Chapel, Windsor and Westminster School. He is Vice-President of the Royal Archaeological Institute. Books include Great Cathedrals of Britain for the BBC Radio 4 series on Cathedrals, The English Cathedral and The English Church and The Abbeys & Priories of England, and most recently Salisbury Cathedral, the making of a Medieval Masterpiece.

15–23 Oct 2014
21–29 Mar 2015
13–19 Sep 2015
12–21 Apr 2015
 Jane Taylor

Jane Taylor

    Has worked as teacher, publisher, writer, photographer and television producer. She studied Mediaeval History and Moral Philosophy at the University of St Andrews and since 1989 has lived in Amman. Her books include Testament to the Bushmen (with Laurens van der Post), Imperial Istanbul, Petra & the Lost Kingdom of the Nabataeans, Yemen: Land & People (with Sarah Searight), Jordan Images from the Air and Beyond the Jordan (with Isabelle Ruben).

9–22 Aug 2015
8–22 Sep 2014
29 Sep–13 Oct 2014
7–21 Sep 2015
 Neil Taylor

Neil Taylor

    A leading expert on the former communist world, he travels there as visiting university lecturer, tourism consultant and tour leader. He read Chinese at Cambridge and has worked in tourism in China, the USSR and many Third World countries. His publications include The Bradt Guide: Estonia, The Bradt Guide: Tallinn, The Bradt Guide: Baltic Cities, A Footprints Guide to Berlin.

18–28 Apr 2015
Dr Lars Tharp

Dr Lars Tharp

    A specialist in ceramics, Lars Tharp appears regularly on The Antiques Roadshow. He was director of the Foundling Museum and is now its Hogarth Curator. He is vice-chairman of The Hogarth Trust and a liveryman on the court of England’s oldest guild, The Worshipful Company of Weavers. He is a member of the English Ceramics Circle, the Oriental Ceramics Society and a Fellow of the venerable Society of Antiquaries of London.
     

20 Feb–6 Mar 2015
24 Nov–7 Dec 2014
Dr Giles Tillotson

Dr Giles Tillotson

    Fellow (and former Director) of the Royal Asiatic Society, he has been Reader in History of Art and Chair of Art & Archaeology at SOAS. His specialisms include the history and architecture of the Rajput courts of Rajasthan and of the Mughal cities of Delhi and Agra; Indian architecture in the period of British rule and after Independence and landscape painting in India. Books include Taj Mahal, Jaipur Nama: Tales from the Pink City, Mughal India, The Tradition of Indian Architecture, and the novel, Return to Bhanupur.

4–10 Nov 2014
24 Feb–2 Mar 2015
Dr Thomas-Leo True

Dr Thomas-Leo True

    Art historian specialising in Renaissance and Baroque architecture in Rome and the Papal States. He received his doctorate from Cambridge University. He also studied at the British School in Rome, where he was Rome Scholar (2009–10) and Giles Worsley Fellow (2013). He has lived in Le Marche region of Italy and is currently writing his first book on the Marchigian Cardinals of Pope Sixtus V.

16–20 Sep 2015
 Gail Turner

Gail Turner

    Art historian, lecturer and artist with a special interest in Spanish history and art. She read Modern History at Oxford, and completed her MA at the Courtauld. She has worked at Tate Britain, the Arts Council, as a consultant for Christie’s and at the Courtauld and lectures for various institutions including the National Trust and the Art Fund. She also teaches on courses at the V&A and the Courtauld Institute Summer School.

–14 Aug 2014
Dr Geoffrey Tyack

Dr Geoffrey Tyack

    Architectural historian. He is Fellow of Kellogg College, University of Oxford and his main academic interests are in British and European architectural history, especially from the 18th–20th century, and the history of urban planning since the Renaissance. His books include John Nash: Architect of the Picturesque. He was co-editor of the revised volume on Berkshire in the Pevsner Buildings of England series, and is currently co-editing a book on the Victorian architect Sir George Gilbert Scott. He is also Editor of the Georgian Group Journal.

10–14 Sep 2014
13–20 Oct 2014
7–14 Sep 2015
19–28 Oct 2015
13–20 Mar 2015
13–19 Apr 2015
29 Apr–12 May 2015
30 Sep–8 Oct 2014
4–15 Nov 2015
24 Sep–1 Oct 2015
 Gijs van Hensbergen

Gijs van Hensbergen

    Art historian and author specialising in Spain and the USA. His books include Gaudí, In the Kitchens of Castile and Guernica and he has published in the Burlington Magazine and Wall Street Journal. He read languages at Utrecht University and Art History at the Courtauld, and undertook postgraduate studies in American art of the 1960s. He has worked in England, the USA and Spain as exhibitions organiser, TV researcher and critic. Visit website.

16–22 Sep 2014
21–27 Jul 2015
Dr David Vickers

Dr David Vickers

    Author, journalist, broadcaster and lecturer. He works as a consultant for many international baroque music organisations and teaches at the Royal Northern College of Music. He is co-editor of The Cambridge Handel Encyclopedia, is preparing new editions of several of Handel’s music dramas and is a critic for The Gramophone and BBC Radio 3. He also writes essays for record labels including BIS, Chandos, Decca, Deutsche Grammophon, EMI and Harmonia Mundi. 

     

30 Aug–4 Sep 2014
Professor Stephen Walsh

Professor Stephen Walsh

    Stephen Walsh is a writer on music. He is the author of a major two-volume biography of Stravinsky, and, most recently Musorgsky and his Circle. He was for many years deputy music critic of the Observer and a frequent contributor to other broadsheet newspapers. He currently holds a personal chair in the School of Music at Cardiff University, and reviews for the website, theartsdesk.com.

19–23 Aug 2014
–7 Oct 2014
 Giles Waterfield

Giles Waterfield

    An independent curator and writer, Director of Royal Collection Studies and Associate Lecturer at the Courtauld Institute of Art. He is a trustee of the Charleston Trust and a member of the National Trust Arts Panel and of the Advisory Panel of the NHMF. He has curated exhibitions including The Artist’s Studio and publications include Soane and After; Palaces of Art; Art for the People and Art Treasures of England.

22 Sep–2 Oct 2015
Dr Peter Webb

Dr Peter Webb

    Arabist and historian, specialising in the cultures of early and mediaeval Islam. He completed his PhD at the School of African and Oriental Studies where he then taught classical Arabic literature and history. He has travelled extensively across the Middle East and Central Asia and has studied at the Universities of Damascus and Isfahan. He has taught at the American University of Paris and is currently a Fellow at the Forum Transregionale Studien, Berlin, where he researches art, poetry and magic in Mamluk Cairo. He has published numerous papers and book reviews and is writing his first book, Imagining the Arabs, an exploration of the Arab people in early Islam.

Dr Adam White

Dr Adam White

    An art historian and museum curator who has worked at the Leeds Museums and Galleries since 1983. Since 1994 he has been based at Lotherton Hall and Temple Newsam House, two of the houses which we shall be visiting. He is Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London and has published widely on British art, particularly sculpture.

16–22 Feb 2015
13–19 Apr 2015
13–19 Mar 2015
10–17 Oct 2014
–4 Nov 2014
–4 Feb 2015
30 Sep–4 Oct 2015
20–27 Oct 2014
22–29 May 2015
Dr Antonia Whitley

Dr Antonia Whitley

    Art historian and lecturer specialising in the Italian Renaissance, though her interests also include paintings of World War One. She obtained her PhD from the Warburg Institute, University of London, on Sienese society in the 15th century and has published articles on related topics. She has lectured for the National Gallery, has taught in the War Studies department of King’s College, London and has led many tours in Italy. She organises adult education study sessions and private tours. Visit Dr Antonia Whitley's website.
     

24–29 Jan 2015
21–28 Aug 2014
3–11 Aug 2014
20–22 Feb 2015
13–15 Mar 2015
 Richard Wigmore

Richard Wigmore

    Music writer, lecturer and broadcaster for BBC Radio 3. He writes for BBC Music Magazine and Gramophone and has taught classes in Lieder history and intepretation at the Guildhall, Trinity College of Music and Birkbeck College. He read French and German at Cambridge and later studied Music at the Guildhall. His publications include Schubert: the complete song texts and Pocket Guide to Haydn.

Dr Richard Williams

Dr Richard Williams

    Art historian with a PhD on 16th century religious art from the Courtauld Institute. He specialises in the Northern Renaissance and lectures on 16th and 17th century English, German and Flemish art, with a particular interest in religious imagery in 16th century Protestant collections. He teaches at Birkbeck, University of London and the Courtauld Institute Summer School, (both University of London) and at the National Gallery. He co-edited and contributed to Art Re-Formed: Reassessing the Contribution of the Reformation (Cambridge, 2007). Richard is the V&A's course director for the High Renaissance to Baroque course.

Dr Sam Willis

Dr Sam Willis

    A leading authority on naval and maritime history and author of numerous books on maritime and naval history including the Hearts of Oak Trilogy and the Fighting Ships Series. He has worked as maritime history consultant for Christies, The Discovery Channel and the History Channel. In 2012 Sam presented a BBC4 film about Antigua in the Age of Sail and in 2013 he presented a 3-part series on Shipwrecks for BBC4. His re-creation of the first ever voyage down the Grand Canyon will be broadcast in 2014 on BBC2.

12–17 Oct 2015
3–10 Oct 2015
Professor Roger WIlson

Professor Roger WIlson

    Professor of the Archaeology of the Roman Empire and Director of the Centre for the Study of Ancient Sicily at the University of British Columbia. He was formerly Professor of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham and Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology at the University of Dublin. His publications include Piazza Armerina, Sicily under the Roman Empire and A Guide to the Roman Remains in Britain. In 2013 he received the University of British Columbia’s Killam Research Prize ‘for outstanding research contributions’.

8–14 Jun 2015
5–7 Sep 2014
4–6 Sep 2015
Dr Matthew Woodworth

Dr Matthew Woodworth

    Studied History of Art and Architecture at Brown University, Rhode Island, and obtained his MA from the Courtauld. He completed his PhD on the architectural history of Beverley Minster at Duke University, North Carolina. He is currently teaching in Elgin, Scotland, and writing one of the volumes for Pevsner’s Buildings of Scotland Series. He has published articles on English Gothic architecture, French Gothic sculpture, and the re-use of Gothic in the post-mediaeval period.

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